Field of Honour, Field of Life – TV Trailer

to safeguard remembrance by future generations

‘Field of Honour, Field of Life’ portrays a new and (r)evolutionary form of commemorating and honouring both those who lost their lives in wartime, and those who live on bearing the scars of the losses suffered. Field of Life is a tribute that unites the commemoration of loss and bravery with gratitude and recognition for the freedom and human rights conquered by battle, endurance and by resistance.

This particular Field of Honour, Ereveld Loenen in the Netherlands, is home to almost 4000 graves. It is the last resting place of predominantly young men and women, military and civilians, political activists and resistance fighters; neighbours who lost their lives for a cause whose victory they could not share but which ultimately lead to freedom for so many others.

A visual concept of how the impact of war and the need to safeguard remembrance by future generations is conveyed to youngsters by means of a unique and powerful experience.

Beyond words, visitors both young and old, students, teachers, military and representatives standing behind the graves who experience this ‘Field of Honour, Field of Life’ come to recognise the impact what it truly represents at a deeper inner level.

Not because they are told or because they see, but because for a moment in time they become part of the experience.

This format shows the Field of Honour as we know it from different perspectives and the field as it fills with life. We see how the ‘Field of Honour, Field of Life’ impacts on youngsters, visitors and families who take part in the experience and share their reflections with us on how this contributes to, changes or influences their earlier perspective on remembrance.

Photography by Photoline – Carolien Sikkenk

A crucial part of the plot underlying this visual document is the personal history shared by family members whose grandparents, parents, partners and even children rest under one of the many white stones at Ereveld Loenen.

Stories that often remain untold; stories of loss and sacrifice, courage, strength and resilience and about loved ones whose absence continues to mark the lives of those left behind, often for many generations to come.

Rows of meandering white stones engraved with names and dates are the silent, unmoving witnesses of many young lives that came to an early, abrupt and often violent end.

For those of us who visit and who take the time to absorb the information engraved on the stones – 17 years of age, 19, 29, 23 years of age….. five young family members side-by side … it is hard to remain untouched by the unfinished life stories that these stones represent.

Nothing however, prepares us for the impact of seeing a living person symbolising a life that was brought to an abrupt end by war, standing behind a grave as we walk further into the field. Or for the 10, 20, more than 100 people, each standing by a gravestone, each a living witness honouring a life that was lost.

Those behind the graves correspond in age to the age marked under the name on the gravestone at their feet.

For a moment in time, the life lost and the story beyond the stone has a living face that we can all relate to: each face could have been someone we love – a father or grandfather, brother, son, cousin, mother or sister.

Each, whether they be military or civilian, with hopes, plans and dreams for the future that they did not live long enough to experience.

Beyond words, visitors both young and old, students, teachers, military and representatives standing behind the graves who experience this ‘Field of Honour, Field of Life’ come to recognise the impact what it truly represents at a deeper inner level.

Not because they are told or because they see, but because for a moment in time they become part of the experience.

Storyline Timo Smeehuijzen (subtitled)

‘Field of Honour, Field of Life’ is a protected format. For more information please send an Email to the copyright holders:

Email: info@ereveldvolleven.nl

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